Category Archives: Baseball

The August Puzzler

Here’s the August Puzzler.

Your question this month is very straightforward:

What is it? And where is it?

There you have it. Enter your answers as a comment. I’ll reveal the solution in a couple of weeks.

Good Luck!

Larry


Wait ’til Next Year – A Poem

For the White Sox a new season,

White Sox Fireworks

White Sox Fireworks 

A renewable fan,

An annual optimist,

I am a new man.

A gullible fan, forget

Last year’s heartbreak,

I am a trusting man,

With dim fading dream.

Since autumn’s disgust,

Certain moves have been made.

We have a new team,

Renewing the dream.

But bad moves were made,

Still, we buy season tickets.

This is a new team?

So many new names.

So I scalp all my tickets,

The annual opportunist,

Forget the new names.

For the Sox, a Cubs season.

by Larry Ambrose


Rhyme of the Fearsome Scuttlejack

Reminiscence of Lake Michigan sailing days aboard my little boat, the Mimsy . . .

T’was lurkish, and the wiffly flooves

Did stretch the ensigns toward the blay.

The Mimsy rode the rounding loofs,

And the good skiff wahfed onway.

Be sure to mind the smarms my boys,

The troughs that trap, the swells that flip!

Beware the carpful Scuttlejack, and fight

The awrful Floundership.

We held our ruddle fast in hand,

The tithey deep our fullsome foe.

Then raggled we upon the sea,

And sloggened splays did blow.

As crew we verved, and as we plied,

The Scuttlejack, aboil, appeared.

And orgled forth, it us soon spied,

Overpowering, as we’d feared.

With sudden sputt the Mimsy cut

Toward haven, dock and rest.

The Scuttlejack lay on its back

For we had passed the test.

Oh, how we scowed into our slip!

We cried Hip Hip Hooray!

We live to wahf another ship,

Though shan’t forget this day!

T’was lurkish and the wiffly flooves

Did stretch the ensigns toward the blay.

The Mimsy rode the rounding loofs,

And the good skiff wahfed onway.

By Larry Ambrose

Inspired by “The Jabberwock”, from Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, by Lewis Carroll.